PE 2000 – nXt Generation, ‘VERZET’ (RESISTANCE) @Willem Davids +AUDIO +Script

NOMINATED: PRIX EUROPA 2000 ‘MARKET PLACE’.

‘nXt Generation’  “VERZET’ (‘Resistance’)

nXt Resistance -Docurap  / AUDIO 38′

nXt Verzet / Resistance -Videoclip’

S Y N O P S I S,  C R E D I T S   &   S C R I P T  (E)
nXt-Generation: Resistance!


In ‘nXt-Generation: Resistance’, three Dutch rappers and two documentary makers explore the sources of resistance movements, in the past as well as in the present. These five find instances of ‘Resistance’ as it’s taking shape or did so in the past, like World War II resistance leader, or the so-called ‘white illegal aliens’ (foreign people who have lived in the Netherlands for years, always paid their taxes and played a full part in Dutch society, yet now face expulsion – they went on a hunger-strike).

In this documentary, young people meet face with old people, ethnics with locals, while traditional documentary style patterns are contrasted with styles from the world of hiphop (or rather ‘Nederhop’, a local equivalent using Dutch lyrics).

These three rappers are quite famous with the house and rap pundits – one of them is actually considered to be the founder of Nederhop. In their rap songs they use an authentic Amsterdam vernacular.

The programme was broadcasted by Radio 5 (the Dutch ‘talk’ channel) and has been broadcast again by Radio 3FM, the public broadcasting company’s rock channel, on World War II Remembrance Day and Liberation Day, 4th and 5th May 2000, respectively.


A programm @RVU, made by:

‘Sores’ (Rense Vanderhoek), rapper and graphics artist

Daan van Wegen, rapper and beat creator

‘Def P’ (Pascal Griffioen), rapport and lyrics writer (founder of Nederhop)

Willem Jan Hagens, documentary maker

Willem Davids, documentary maker

Editing
Willem Davids

Production
Willem Davids


(AIR-RAID SIRENS)

(MARCHING SOLDIERS)

DEF P&SORES: Left, right, left, right…

SCHOOLBOY: Resistance, fight oppression
Of men, by men
Is power all that matters?
And worth killing someone for then?
Resistance, fight those thoughts
That you’re better than someone else’s son
Don’t make yourself superior
Live side by side with the other one
Resistance, fight this bloody war
Make sure it doesn’t begin
Coz war knows only victims
No-one can ever win
Resistance, it’s such a brave word
Standing up for your own belief,
But wouldn’t you rather see
There was no need for resistance or grief?

SORES: It’s just word play. There shouldn’t be any need for resistance, but when it comes to it, you do need resistance.

(MUMBLED APPROVAL)

SORES: I mean, I don’t know what I’m saying. You don’t want oppression. That’s what you’re saying. There shouldn’t be any oppression. But if there’s oppression, then most definitely there’s got to be resistance too. I’m not talking about using weapons or not using weapons. Those are things that depend on the situation. But it’s just that there shouldn’t be any need for resistance.

DEF P: It’s a bit like saying: There shouldn’t be any police. But what you mean is: There shouldn’t be any criminals.

SCHOOLBOY: That’s right.

DEF P: It’s just going one little step further in your mind. You’re talking about an ideal world, one that will always remain an illusion. The intention is sincere, but it will always be difficult, you know.

SCHOOLBOY: Oh yes, sure, I couldn’t agree more. It’s not going to happen, but still that’s how I feel about it.

DEF P: Yeah.

DAAN: But there is room for the “irresistible” things in life.

WILLEM: Irresistible things, haha.

(AIR-RAID SIRENS, PIANO MUSIC)

TOM KLUMPER: I’m Tom Klumper, I’m 56. I wrote a study on the Dutch Resistance movement in the 1940-1945 period.

JAN V. HESSEN: I’m Jan van Hessen, retired professor. I’m 82 years old. Between May 15, 1940 and April 4, 1945 I was a fairly active member of what was later referred to as the Dutch resistance movement.

(DRUM BEAT, AIR-RAID SIRENS)

WILLEM JAN: We’re on the threshold of the 21st century.

JAN V. HESSEN: Right. (SNIFFS)

WILLEM JAN: The 20st century has seen two world wars.

JAN V. HESSEN: Oh yes.

WILLEM JAN: One of which we experienced first-hand.

JAN V. HESSEN: Yes, yes. (SNIFFS AGAIN)

WILLEM JAN: And we had to join the resistance movement.

JAN V. HESSEN: Indeed.

WILLEM JAN: There’s a fair chance that, in the course of the 21st century, somewhere something will happen…

JAN V. HESSEN: Right, that…

WILLEM JAN: …that prompts us to join a resistance movement.

JAN V. HESSEN: Yeah. (SNIFFS AGAIN)

WILLEM JAN: What advice would you give us for the 21st century?

JAN V. HESSEN: One thing: Always prepare for the worst.

WILLEM JAN: And what other advice do you have?

TOM KLUMPER: You see… Sorry.

JAN V. HESSEN: Yeah, we know that. Yes.

(AIR-RAID SIRENS)

TOM KLUMPER: Find out what the enemy wants. Where does he put… Where is… the focus, the emphasis. What does he want?

JAN V. HESSEN: Well, then you make sure you develop a technique and qualify yourself for what you’re supposed to do then, you see?

(SOLDIERS MARCHING)

(JORIS VOORHOEVE, DUTCH FORMER MINISTER OF DEFENCE:)
Time and again democracies are outwitted by criminals seizing power…

(VIOLINS, AIR-RAID SIRENS, NOISES)

(SOUND ARCHIVE:)
Here is a message from air control. A squadron of airplanes is seen over Arnhem, heading west. (HEAVY BASS
SOUND) Message from air control. Numerous airplanes spotted over the province of Groningen. Message from air control. Parachutists landed near Gouda. Airplanes over The Hague…

(RAP BASS)

DEF P: On the one hand you have the word “underground” used in a “war” sense, but nowadays it is also used in a musical context, meaning something like “obscure”, or receiving little attention.

WILLEM JAN: We’re talking about the resistance movement.

DEF P: I’m really anxious to hear those stories from real resistance fighters. You see, nowadays all you have is people engaged in protest actions. Which is all very nice, but what really fascinates me is this old stuff, you know, when bullets were really flying.

(VIOLIN)

WILLEM JAN: Shall we call you Mr. Minco, or simply Bill?

BILL MINCO: I don’t really care.

WILLEM JAN: Would Bill be alright then? We would prefer that, it’s nice and short.

DEF P: We do the rapping, and he writes the music.

BILL MINCO: What’s that, “rap”, how do you spell that?

DEF P: R-A-P.

BILL MINCO: I pulled a face only because…

DEF P: No need for that.

BILL MINCO: …because I wasn’t sure about the spelling.

(MUSIC STARTS)

IMPROMPTU RAP:

DEF P: Unprepared for an unexpected situation
The war spreads like a tumour in this nation
Occupied by evil forces, no opposition in sight
And now we wonder, which of us will get up and fight?

BILL MINCO: I was living in Rotterdam, I was still a schoolboy, seventeen years old. One boy in my class, the boy sitting next to me, Arie Overwater and I, we considered trying to get to England. Just a bit of adventure it was. We both hated school. I forgot to say I was pretty motivated, because: (a) we watched Rotterdam being bombed, the whole city centre had been bombed out. In the street where we lived, I was standing on the roof of the Domestic Science School, and I saw those Junckers, those German airplanes, flying over Rotterdam at low altitude, and just bombing everything to smithereens without ever being shot at – it was like an open, …undefended city. I’m Jewish, I knew what had been going on since Germany, in ’38. And besides, we had this spirit of adventure, we wanted to fight those (BEAT) Germans.

(THEME MUSIC FROM DUTCH WAR MOVIE)

BILL MINCO: It’s just beyond me how those guards in Mauthausen, the worst concentration camp… in Germany, where I was a prisoner for three, two and a half months, how during the day they could beat you with their clubs, some prisoners they beat to death, or beat them on their way to the stone quarries. (PAUSE) Those SS men, because it was such a remote area, they lived near the camp. They lived there with their families. They would come home in the evening, kissing the wife, taking their children in their arms, playing games with them.

SORES: So they had a view of the camp, from their houses, like eh?

BILL MINCO: They could see the camp, yes. But how you can beat people to death by day and then in the evening take your kid in your arms…

DEF P: Their wives probably said something like: “How was your day, honey?”

BILL MINCO: Yes.

DEF P: Like it was a perfectly normal thing.

SORES: “I had a quiet day, thank you dear.”

BILL MINCO: Power breeds corruption, the saying goes.

(SOUND ARCHIVE:) Long live our nation.

(RAP BASS)

BILL MINCO: Controlling other people apparently makes you lose your senses.

DEF P: Your common sense, yes.

BILL MINCO: And you know what the worst thing was? That it could happen to you and me as well, I think, in a particular situation. I was fortunate enough… I am… and all those highs and lows in my life have taught me quite a lot. I was sentenced to death, as a boy. I was… Seventeen months I spent in solitary confinement. I survived Mauthausen, the worst concentration camp, I was there for no more than 2_ months or so. Longer would have been impossible anyway, for then I would have been dead, or killed. I survived Auschwitz, I survived Dachau. I have… all those things happened to a single human being in one lifetime. That’s what’s so special – it may sound silly, but that’s the way it is – that’s what makes my story so unique, the fact that one human being has lived through all that. And is able to look back on all that misery.

(SOUND ARCHIVE:)
And here’s our military forces spokesman with the weekly review.

(SOUND ARCHIVE, TRUMPET INTRO:)
…with a staggering number of resistance men, a partisan army on slippers, unarmed, some dressed in civilian clothes, to engage the enemy, the traitors. So, members of the resistance group, the Dutch fighters, the organization that has done so many extraordinary things in support of our just cause, the people of the Netherlands, honest patriots, the people of the Netherlands, the patriots… (DRUM BEAT) …the Dutch fighters, so members of the resistance group, fighters of the resistance movement, the people of the Netherlands, the patriots, Dutchman, honest patriots, long live our nation.

RAP:
DEF P: Unprepared for an unexpected situation
The war spreads like a tumour in this nation
Occupied by evil forces, no opposition in sight
And now we wonder, which of us will get up and fight?

SORES: Resistance, fight, this occupation is vile
My friends are gone, disappeared without a trial
Unjust, cruel, I have no words for this scum
Is there no way out of this misery, this slum?

DEF P: Then again, I have everything to lose
No limits, all my life I’ve saved up my money, worked real hard
For my home, my business, my car, my family
And I’m not giving that up, I’ll raise hell if need be

SORES: Lost everything I got
While my pockets were empty
And even my pockets they wouldn’t leave me
Gotta do something
Resistance, fight, no reason to stay
I just wanted to pack my bags
But who the hell took my bags away?

DEF P: All or nothing, we’re all in the same boat
I’m not gonna compromise
Look hard enough, and you’ll find a road
A life for my life, I don’t care if I die
Tit for tat, a tooth for a tooth, an eye for an eye

SORES: Try as we may, it’s no use
I’m gonna do it alone,
And get one of those guys
Sabotage, he’ll pay for his lies
I’ve got nothing to lose
I’m gonna fight real mean
It’s not as if I can choose

DEF P: I’m gonna use knowledge to fight ignorance
Give those oppressors a piece of their own violence
Tangle up their red tape or even kill
It’s only results that matter still

SORES: There’s something we can do
Throw a spanner into their machine
The two of us will pull it off
We’ll disrupt their ugly scheme
I’ll risk my life, at least it’s a start
Hoping I can hit them hard
You and I, we’ll play a part

DEF P: The war gets dirty, but we fight like brothers
They took our mothers and our fodder
But those motherfuckers will shudder
We’ll prepare a recipe from our resistance book
Laced by our underground resistance cook

DEF P: The war gets dirty, but we fight like brothers
They took our mothers and our fodder
But those motherfuckers will shudder
We’ll prepare a recipe from our resistance book
Laced by our underground resistance cook

(SOUND ARCHIVE:)
So members of the resistance group, the Dutch fighters, the organization that has done so many extraordinary things in support of our just cause, the people of the Netherlands, honest patriots, the people of the Netherlands, the patriots, the Dutch fighters, so members of the resistance group, fighters of the resistance movement, the people of the Netherlands, the patriots, the people of the Netherlands, honest patriots, long live our nation.

(SOFT VIOLIN MUSIC)

BILL MINCO: Power breeds corruption, so they say.

(RADIO PLAY:) (IN GERMAN) Quick run, or I’ll blow your head off, you scum. Faster, scumbag, faster.

DEF P: People have told me stories before, you know. But nothing like this.

(RADIO PLAY:) (IN GERMAN) Faster, faster.

DEF P: The contrasts become so clear, you know.

SORES: This may be worth telling. He compares himself to an object in his house. That’s… a pot in the hallway. A Cologne pot, standing on a small table. And everyone that passes it, says: “Nice pot.” Vase, whatever. It’s a Cologne pot. A Cologne pot. But this one time he told me… It so happened that he’d dropped this pot. Only bits and pieces left. But he’s rather clever with his hands, so he managed to glue all those bits and pieces together again. (OPENS A CAN OF BEER) So now, whenever someone passes this pot, saying: “Nice pot”, he always says: “Sure, what you see is a pot, but all I can see are bits and pieces glued together.” And that’s how he sees himself.

(VIOLIN MUSIC FADING IN, FOLLOWED BY FADE-OUT)

SORES: Beaten by foreign invaders
They smashed me like a pot
Weakened, what I can hold is not a lot
Picking up my bits and pieces
I put everything back in place, using time as my glue
I did a pretty good job
Yet what you see, isn’t true
Because here I’m standing
Just like before, looking strong
But don’t see me as this pot
I’m only bits and pieces, I do not belong

(LOW PIANO SOUNDS)

WILLEM JAN: We’ve just been welcomed in the reception room of the Aalten townhall. They really came out in force to receive us. Even the mayor is here. We’re all sitting around a large table.

MAYOR OF THE TOWN OF AALTEN:
Yes, we’re actually going to see this place. Yes, where people really had to go into hiding. Whenever there was a raid, when people actually had to hide, took refuge in a house. Whenever he was afraid of being caught, that’s the place where he could hide out. And we’re actually gonna see this place.

(LOW PIANO SOUND)

WILLEM JAN: That is the mayor talking.

(RADIO PLAY:) (IN GERMAN:) Open up, open up, or we’ll start shooting.

MAYOR OF THE TOWN OF AALTEN:
All you had was a few seconds to go to a hiding place in the house, where the Germans wouldn’t find you.

ALDERMAN: Just imagine, there was this bedroom with a wash-stand in it. You simply turned away this wash-stand, and there was an opening behind it – that was your hiding place.

(MUSIC FADES OUT)

DEF P: I’m just wondering what they did with the drain pipe, for the water tap I mean, when you turned this whole thing away, surely the pipe must have led to a point somewhere behind this hatch.

ALDERMAN: The tap probably didn’t work.

DAAN: Or they put a bucket behind it.

BILL MINCO: It was probably connected to a hose.

DEF P: Anyone in hiding needs the Gamma.
(GAMMA=DO-IT-YOURSELF CENTER)

(LAUGHTER, MUSIC STARTS)

(POEM BY DUTCH AUTHOR/POET REMCO CAMPERT:)
DAAN: Resistance doesn’t begin met big words
But with small things
Like a storm is heralded by rustling in a garden
Or a cat, acting funny all of a sudden
Asking yourself a question
That’s how resistance begins
Then repeating that question to someone else

DEF P: The other day I found a pamphlet from the Amsterdam police in my letter box, asking the people of Amsterdam, literally, well not really, but they did ask them to be angry again. Because it said… What it boiled down to, was that social control seems to be… to be non-existent nowadays, with everyone going out into the street thinking anything goes. They all throw their garbage out on the street, riding their mopeds on the pavement. They may seem like minor annoyances, but they build up to create one big chaos. What the police are actually saying is, we can’t control it anymore, we need the people to restore this feeling of social control, we need to solve this together. But it’s a sad thing that they need pamphlets, that is doesn’t happen by itself. In the old days it did. Why is that?

SORES: Personally I think it just won’t work, this pamphlet thing.

DAAN: I think actually…

DEF P: Well…

SORES: They’re making perfect fools of themselves, in my opinion.

JAN V. HESSEN: To be honest, I think what we see is a falling apart of standards and values among numerous groups of people, and what you end up with is a ‘nuclear’ society, so to speak.

WILLEM JAN: In a society like this, could you ever get a new resistance movement together?

JAN V. HESSEN: Ha, that’s a poser.

BILL MINCO: I think, alternatively … Sorry. You just cannot isolate yourself. You must try to collaborate with other people to…

WILLEM JAN: Is that really true?

BILL MINCO: …to change all this.

(PEOPLE TALKING – UNINTELLIGIBLE)

WILLEM JAN: But this is a different age, isn’t it?

(ELECTRIC GUITAR)

DEF P: Yes, now you have what I consider to be an urban attitude…

DEF P&SORES, FADING IN:
left, right…

DEF P: …this ‘only look after yourself’ feeling. Like… (RAP BASS) …who cares what happens to the neighbour. As long as I’m okay.

BILL MINCO: That’s today’s attitude for you.

SORES: Can I say something…

RAP:
SORES: Dear Mr Chairman, my mind’s in a haze
I lost my way in this political maze
I thought I understood what was going on
That it was just a Punch&Judy show, a bit of fun
Is this information or just party rap?
Is your political party selling me a load of crap?
Left wing, right wing, your logic ain’t my thing
Gimme the microphone, this bird’s gonna sing
Give it to my straight
Who’s behind this cover-up scene
Scratching each other’s backs, building a smoke-screen
Chamber filled with empty talk, profiles low
Politicians dragging their feet
Tell me, I have a right to know
Keep it vague, it’s always the same
‘No comment’, that’s the name of the game
A game that’s shady, they know no shame
But why can’t politics go public

DEF P&SORES: Left, right…

DEF P: Political debates are only sham, no real fight
Just endless bickering between left and right
It’s all words, it don’t mean a thing
A proud and pompous puppet parade
Down well-trodden paths, a pitiful charade
But don’t let their capers fool you
Don’t give them free rein or they’ll rule you
They’ll trample you, they’ll cause you harm
So before they drug us with words, I’ll set the alarm
Opinions of minions, they violate every right, every border
We gotta stand up and fight their New Order
Use your rights, your vote is all you’ve got
To demonstrate the limits of power to this lot
Those Parliament-aryans are at it again
About referendums they don’t give a damn
An axe in the people’s backs
These gentlemen feel so superior
Their uebermensch attitude shouldn’t make us feel inferior
Have your say, make it go away
Make sure that peace is here to stay
No more war, not a single day
Today’s youth, the generation of tomorrow,
No pardon for those nazis, don’t tell us where we should go
Free man, it’s up to you, now I use words to capture you
But freedom of speech was once won by killing too
Present-day apathy won’t win a fight
So make a noise, raise your voice
Left, right

DEF P&SORES: Left, right…

TOM KLUMPER: So often, yes. I’ve discussed this extensively with… former members of the resistance movements, and (CLEARS THROAT) these are perfectly normal human reactions – getting angry. About things happening in the street. Things that just… this overwhelming display of power. It’s simply a matter of getting angry, really pissed. About things that are happening, the things you hear on the radio. Right? A newspaper with all those white spaces in it. It does happen.

JAN V. HESSEN: This feeling of being screwed.

TOM KLUMPER: So these are basic, fundamentally human reactions.

(DOOR SLAMMING)

‘WHITE’ILLEGAL ALIEN:
I think we should join an action committee, you know.

(ORIENTAL-SOUNDING MUSIC)

(CAR DOORS SLAMMING)

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
But sir, please don’t take picture there, you know? No picture.

WILLEM JAN: Fine with us. Cameras away.

DAAN: Meanwhile we’re in a primary school somewhere in the Schilderswijk, a residential area in The Hague. This is where the so-called ‘white illegal aliens’ are hiding out. Ahum. Right from the start it had this air of illegality. We were not supposed to take pictures of the people present here. And that’s a clear indication of something illegal going on here. Right now we’re waiting for their contact to come out for an interview.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
I came here illegally, but what’s the problem, you know? Well in Holland, new laws every year, you know. ‘Koppelingswet’, different law. Different law every year. But when I came here in ’87, ’89, I registered at the municipality, then I got social security number, tax registration number, everything.

OTHER ‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
I wrote a short poem for Cohen.
(=JOB COHEN, STATE SECRETARY FOR POLITICAL ASYLUM AND IMMIGRATION POLICIES)

WILLEM: You’re gonna read us a poem?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Yes, yes, I’m a poem…

WILLEM: A poet.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Yes. (LAUGHS)

DEF P: Okay.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
My name is Selim, I’m not dumb
The Justice Department says: you are all welcome
I work in textile and market gardening
Holland, I love this nice country, sure thing
Use a pen, expensive brand
I am on hungerstrike in Agnes Church
Women, children, welcome
Cohen, do you really think we’re all dumb?

DEF P: What are the main reasons why you want to stay here?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
When I go back to Turkey, what can I do? How can I live there, what will I live off?

WILLEM: Eh hm, find work?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Impossible.

WILLEM: Why?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
When you go to other country for 13 years…

(INTERRUPTION – UNINTELLIGIBLE)
…then life gets really difficult there.

OTHER ‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
You have no work experience in Turkey.

WILLEM: I have no work experience in Turkey, no.

OTHER ‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
You have no work experience in Turkey. What can you do in Turkey? Exactly. Yes.

WILLEM JAN: Meanwhile I’ve found out what the Turkish word is for ‘underground resistance’: kar?i koyma.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIENS:
Kar?i koyma. Right, kar?i koyma.

(INTERRUPTION – UNINTELLIGIBLE)

WILLEM JAN: That means underground resistance. Is that what you’re doing right now?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIENS:
I don’t know. We just want an easy life here (CELLULAR TELEPHONE RINGING). It’s a bit like, the people here are used like they were in Auschwitz, in a way. A bit like Auschwitz, really, with us white illegals.

WILLEM JAN: But they don’t kill you with gas here, do they? I mean, in Auschwitz people were slaughtered by the hundreds of thousands, millions even.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Sure, but you see…

WILLEM JAN: Here it’s just a matter of getting a residence permit.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Yes, but you see… No, I understand why you say that. But torture doesn’t mean, you torture someone physically, but it’s also psychological torture.

DEF P: You all entered our country illegally, right? At the time, what did you expect to find in Holland?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Listen, I’ll tell you one thing. There’s been immigration since Eve and Adam. Everything tries to make a living somewhere. For instance, we tried to find a place in the Netherlands, which was pretty easy in those days. I mean, you’re a Dutchman too.

DEF P: Yes.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
And you have not… you’re not … you’re not registered with the aliens office, but you are registered as a citizen of your municipality. So we’re not different. There is no difference between you and me.

DEF P: Why is it then that you have to leave this country, and I don’t?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
They have no need for me now, so I must leave.

(ORIENTAL-SOUNDING MUSIC)

OTHER ‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Justice Department say: You’re all welcome <!–HierHier–>
I work in textile and market gardening
Holland, I love this nice country, sure thing
13 years of working, illegally, legally
For my colleagues Leo, Ad, and Piet
13 years of working, illegally, legally
When there’s danger, sorry, I don’t work
I’m not popular, problem must go back
Cohen say: illegal aliens go back
You listen, I’m gonna write
Wife and children, they too want to live
Write with pen, expensive brand
I’m on hungerstrike in Agnes Church
Women, children, welcome
Cohen, do you really think we’re all dumb?

(APPLAUSE)

DEF P: Do you know any illegal aliens who worked here for a long time and were yet expelled?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
A lot.

DEF P: Do you have contact with them?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
No. Yes. (CELLLULAR TELEPHONE RINGING) From some I have had news.

DEF P: What happens to the people who were sent back? How do they respond, what are they telling you from Turkey?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Of course some are always trying to get back. But I won’t. And if they should expel me, I’m not gonna return, ever. That’s how I feel about it now.

DEF P: Would you try another country then?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
I would try go get into some other country, yes.

DEF P: So Holland was your first choice, so to speak. What would have been your second choice, if they forced you to choose?

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Yes, well… I’m not the kind of person who… How do I…

DEF P: So you’re really living from day to day here.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
What I’m going to in the next decade or so. …I’ve never really…

DEF P: So because you’re illegal aliens, you’re really living from day to day.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Exactly.

DEF P: Just like that, day after day after day.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Right. Day.

DEF P: Just waiting.

‘WHITE’ ILLEGAL ALIEN:
Right.

(ORIENTAL-SOUNDING MUSIC FADING IN AGAIN).

(DOOR SLAMMING).

SORES: …a trip coming up… haha.

DEF P: These guys are in bad need of a proper spokesman, because this was downright ridiculous. They just know too little Dutch to really be able to say what they mean. There is no way we can communicate properly. This just leads nowhere.

(CLEARS THROAT)

SORES: But they’ve sure been screwed.

DAAN: That’s a fact.

SORES: I’ve gotta say that for them. I had different thoughts about it at first, but when they told me they had social security numbers, that it was okay for them to work, that they were registered….

DEF P: They’re good enough to pay taxes, but when it comes down to it, they tell them to shove off.

SORES: I’m not seeing anyone anymore. (IMITATES SOUND OF CELLULAR PHONE)
(LAUGHTER)

(MUSIC, PAPER RUSTLING)

IMPROMPTU RAP:
SORES: It takes an enemy to live in peace
War machine shares you can buy or lease
Parliament corridor deals, trenches dug
All they care about is economics, people suck
Piles of money for defence budgets
Arms suppliers smiling smugly in their beds
People numbed by too many horrors on TV
National intelligence dictates what we hear and see

(OLD JAZZ MUSIC)

(SIREN+MUSIC START)

(JORIS VOORHOEVE, FORMER MINISTER OF DEFENCE)
Each and every time democracies are checkmated by criminals who dominate…

RAP:
DEF P: As long as people live, the fighting will go on
As long as people fight, the suffering won’t be gone
It is in our genes, they’ll never be content
In wanting more and more is how their lives are spent
Selfishness prevails, money is evil’s root
And of their lust for power is violence the fruit
There’s always a minority who live their lives in fear
We strive in vain for peace that never once was here
Sometimes there is a pause
But then it starts again
People get militant, they’re doing what they please
Upsetting all the others who want to live in peace
For he who is attacked, has to defend his shore
You can’t be neutral, they just drag you into war
All you can do is fight, they kill you off like cattle
The vicious circle of the never ending battle
is like a game of chess, stalemate for ever more.

The game is not checkmate, stalemate is the game
because the fight goes on and will always be the same
One moment there’s a war, the next there is a fête
and then a war again, it’s always been like that.

The game is not checkmate, stalemate is the game
because the fight goes on and will always be the same
One moment there’s a war, the next there is a fête
and then a war again, it’s always been like that.

(SIREN)

(JORIS VOORHOEVE, FORMER MINISTER OF DEFENCE)
Each and every time democracies are checkmated by criminals who dominate…

RAP:
SORES: An enemy is needed with whom to live in peace
The Stock Exchange promotes the war machineries
Anti employment deals through lobbying around,
Not the people but the economic interests count
Large sums are poured into defence budgets
And they who make the arms lie grinning in their beds.
The television pictures are mistaken for real life
And all we need to know is dictated by MI5
When rockets go up, the shares decrease
Protesters are charged by the riot police
More power and profits for the country’s elite
Bloodshed and tears for the man in the street
Media silence, genocide, sphere of taboo
Murderous world trade, bona fide what they do
Mobile transactions
Some are living in wealth, others in mud
The bread they are eating is smeared with blood

DEF.P: The game is not checkmate, stalemate is the game
For the fighting goes on and will always be the same
One moment there’s a war, the next there is a fête
and then a war again, it’s always been like that
Because we’re not checkmate, stalemate is the game
For the fighting goes on and will always be the same
One moment there’s a war, the next there is a fête
and then a war again, it’s always been like that

(Echo):….been like that….been like that

BILL MINCO: First you have to acknowledge that it’s we who are the society.

WILLEM JAN: Yes.

BILL MINCO: That it’s we who brought about what you just pointed out, that our ethics and values have gone to pot to a point where… where we don’t care about each other any more. That’s your fault.

WILLEM JAN: Yes.

BILL MINCO: And my fault. And so if you want to do something about a better society, you have to begin by taking a good look in the mirror every morning.

DEF.P: When I hear all this, it gives me the impression that maybe more people joined the resistance because of personal feelings of hatred, or similar feelings, than with the idea of come on, we’re going to do something beneficial for our country or for our people.

ALL TOGETHER

JAN V.HESSEN: All of that at the same time.

WILLEM JAN: What is the right motivation to join the resistance?

TOM KLUMPER: You can, you join, yes. They keep saying you’re going to join the resistance. You get angry and you and you do something. You want to do something and you talk it over with someone: shall we both….

BILL MINCO: If you stick to that definition, that you get angry, then you’ll also get angry when, not that it really worries me today, maybe I should have, when they start drilling for gas north of Ameland. You can get angry about that too. Or when nuclear waste is being transported from Petten to Zeeland. Then you get, then you get, then you get angry!

(THEME MUSIC DUTCH WAR MOVIE)

DEF.P&SORES: Left, right, left, right, left, right, left, right….

(START RAP BASS RHYTHM)

TRUDEL: I am Trudel van Reemst, I’m 84 and a half.

TRUUS: I am Truus Menger-Overstegen. We’re positive thinking people and we’re, thank God, not the only ones who think positively.
Just remember one thing: the negative people are always in the minority. And if you keep those things in mind, then you’ve won.
People have also become more indifferent.

TRUDEL: Because if you open your trap in the tram these days, you get clouted.

TRUUS: And why d’you think that happens? It’s simply a question of dissatisfaction.

(VIOLINS)

TRUUS: It happened to me, in connection with shooting down traitors, that someone said: “Well, I could never have done that”. But afterall they weren’t standing around my cradle either, saying: “Oh my, she’ll probably turn into someone who starts shooting, dear little baby”. It just happens that way.
And the man who wanted to join the resistance with me, this was the first assault he was going to carry out, ran away from the resistance and never came back. (LAUGHTER) What he thought was, well, he thought: not bad, nice women, and when a German comes along, you can kiss them nicely and all that. That’s not going to work, I thought. Terribly adventurous of course, but this adventure was not what he had expected.

SORES: That was a diversionary action, necking and suchlike? (LAUGHTER)

TRUUS: Well, but anyway, you can have the occasional laugh. No laughing in five years, that’s nonsense of course. People laughed even in Auschwitz.

(START RAP BASS RHYTHM)

WILLEM JAN: What d’you think of “white” illegal immigrants? People who…

TRUUS: I really think they, that now they, they’ve been here for such a long time. Give those people a chance.

WILLEM JAN: We’ve interviewed those people, we went there. And we asked them: “Why d’you want so much to stay?”
The only answer we got was: “It’s an easy life”.

TRUUS: It’s a better life.

WILLEM JAN: “It’s an easy life”.

TRUUS: Easy life, well…

SORES: That’s not entirely true; they think they’ve been taken for a ride.

TRUUS: You can’t, of course, admit everybody, that’s nonsense. You’ve got to adopt a critical attitude. Which doesn’t mean… that a mother with three children, they must be admitted no matter what. Because a mother with children can’t defend herself in a country that’s being bombed.
Real refugees should not be a case for discussion anymore.

TRUDEL: Fight discrimination, fight discrimination, fight discrimination…..

TRUUS: For a child a good teacher is almost indispensable. And how they skimp on just these people, who are actually in charge of our youngsters, it’s crazy really.

DEF.P: Actually they skimp on the future.

TRUUS: On the future, yes, definitely.

DEF.P: Short term thinking.

TRUUS: Yes, that’s right, yes.

TRUDEL: …. fight discrimination, fight discrimination, fight discrimination….

TRUDEL: The task of the future, as I see it, is to prevent fascism from getting the upperhand again. In whatever form. And how that is to happen, is not up to us anymore.

WILLEM: But how do you recognize it?

TRUDEL: The best we can do is to point out: these are the things you have to watch out for, like discrimination. But how you people must tackle it, the next generations, that’s up to you!

DEF.P&SORES: Left, right, left, right, left, right, left, right, left, right, left, right, left, right, left, right….

SORES: From the first sticks and stones lifted up from the ground
There’ve been people who run from others who hound
So he who believes we’re by nature a peace loving lot
Must be walking on air or is some kind of sod
It is no use denying, but we know just the same
That beggar-my-neighbour is the name of the game
It has happened before and still happens of course
I’m telling you, people still flee from brute force

DEF.P&SORES: Left, right, left, right, left, right, left, right,
left, right, left, right, left, right, left,right….

(THEME MUSIC DUTCH WAR MOVIE)

DEF.P: Freedom and happiness, but never forget
What in hidden resistance was legally said.
The soldier of Orange, not in vain were his feats
We shall honour him always with our rhymes and beats

BILL MINCO: Power corrupts, they say. If you have power over
others, you evidently lose your senses.
I think it can also happen to you and me.

DEF.P: With food on my plate and a safe place to be
I have lived since my birth and have always been free
So the meaning of freedom’s no cause for confusion
Although it’s not always a foregone conclusion
‘Cause if you’re not careful and things turn around
Do you think you’ll be joining the undergound?

DEF.P&SORES: “Yes of course”,

DEF.P: is what they all said.
But here were more Nazis than heroes, how about that?
I give it a thought and I think that no doubt
Again most of the Dutch choose the easy way out
Our freedom of speech, which they fought for so well
Is not used by writers, ’cause those books don’t sell
Also records with a message lie forever on the shelf
So there is no doubt: this country is screwing itself
All important in Dutch culture is to make a fast buck
As for underground and heroes, no one gives a fuck
Use your freedom, make it heard
The underground is still spreading the word
True enough that’s in music and differs as such
But we are the final hope of the uneventful Dutch
Freedom and happiness, but never forget
What in hidden resistance was legally said
The soldier of Orange, not in vain were his feats
We shall honour him always with our rhymes and beats

BILL MINCO: It is, and that’s what I also learned in the concentration camps, it is my belief, that people can choose between good and evil. And it’s often easier to choose evil. It’s much more difficult to opt more often for good.

SORES: From the first sticks and stones lifted up from the ground
There’ve been people who run from others who hound
So he who believes we’re by nature a peace loving lot
Must be walking on air or is some kind of sod
It is no use denying, but we know all the same
That beggar-my-neighbour is the name of the game
It has happened before and still happens of course
I’m telling you, people still flee from brute force
Bad luck to be born in a place where they murder
‘Cause that means you must flee always further and further
When you think you have found a hospitable nation
They say : full house or it has another destination
Sheer desperation! My hope becomes weaker and weaker
I swear in silence and rap my ideas through the speaker
It seems that the more you are living in peace
The less you can listen to other one’s pleas
Your granddaddy fought, some relatives died
The law and the Queen’s speech cannot be denied
Happy at last you lose touch with the past
Goddammit it was sixty years ago and no more
(hey) They’re still playing a game of Risk as before
It’s about other continents, so a fat lot I care
Although, there is one unpleasant thing there
That negative travel advice doesn’t seem fair
But let them stay away and kill each other there
Geneva conference or not, we no longer care
Those asylum seekers are a pain, so you be wise
Close the doors to your country, close also your eyes
Tolerance? We bulshit about pointless violence
While over there they cut the throats of innocents
I am no hero, but protest against the politicians
Resistance crosses the borders, also through musicians
BILL MINCO: You talk about how to put up resistance against a possible next world war.
And my attitude, afterall I’m only human myself, so I just try it my way, with all the limited means, I try to help just that little bit, to keep us from sliding even further into the lack of morality, into violence, into egoism, materialism, into a society which in this way will automatically end up in a next war.

WILLEM JAN: So you mean: the fight has already begun?

BILL MINCO: The fight has never stopped. The fight has never stopped, just as the war in 1945 hasn’t.
It has stopped only between Germany and the Allies.
But after 1945 there have been more than 200 wars of all sorts in the whole world.
So it all just goes on.
If we don’t do anything about it and swallow every-
thing and turn off the TV when we see the horrifying images they confront us with, then it will get worse and worse and then we’ll get used to it.
For goodness sake, let’s not get used to it and try,
each in his own way, in his own place and with his
limited means, try, together, to make things a little
bit better.

(MARCHING SOLDIERS)

(SORES)” Hey!

(MARCHING SOLDIERS HALT)  


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